Winter Sport

Winter Sports and Injuries

Winter is upon us! At least in most states snow is beginning to fall and that means people are going to be heading to the slopes and skating rinks. These winter activities have different movements that we are not used to performing during the rest of the year. They can take a toll on the musculoskeletal system if you are unprepared. More than 440,000 people had to go for treatment at the doctor’s office, hospital, or emergency room in 2010 due to participation in winter sports. Here are some tips to think about before starting.

Warm up:

Just like with any other sport be sure you are warmed up properly before you start. Proper warm up means taking the time to do a general dynamic warm up. Focus on warming up the muscles you will be using during the activity you will be performing. Warm up enough to raise your body temperature and get the blood flowing to the muscle groups you will be using. Do not perform static stretches with long holds at this time.

Stop when you first begin to feel tired:

Take breaks in activity when needed. Most injuries happen at the end of the day when your body is fatigued. Pushing yourself when you’re tired may lead to injury that prevents further activity during the rest of the season. Save something for next time.

Food and water:

Be sure you are eating well, and you are continually hydrating. The more work you are doing the more water your body will need. By the time you feel thirsty you are already dehydrated. Proper nutrition is vital to help keep your body strong and ready to take on the activities at hand.

Stretch after activity:

Be sure you do a proper static stretch when you finish your activity. This will help lengthen muscles, and may keep them from becoming tight and in a weakened state.

Injury prevention:

Chiropractic care has been proven to play a role in injury prevention, as well as helping the body recover after an injury. Chiropractic care can help your musculoskeletal system be stronger and more flexible.

snow

Other Related Health Topics:

Immunity Boosters

Chiropractic Care

Why Drink Water?

Reducing Inflammation

Getting Outdoors with Allergies

Stretches

Remember that this information is for educational purposes only. Seek the advice of a health specialist before making any changes to your healthcare.

REF:

http://www.biomedcentral.com/content/pdf/1471-2474-11-64.pdf

http://www.cachevalleydaily.com/news/article_7779d196-6b7d-11e4-8db6-23b363e7a9ea.html

Stretches

Stretches: low back and legs

If you are in spring training, or doing a spring sport, be sure to use these stretches after your workout to help relax tight muscles. It should take you around five minutes, and it’ll do a lot of good!

 

  1. Piriformis stretch:  Lying down face up with knees bent, place your right ankle on your left knee. Grasp behind your left thigh and bring it toward your chest. Hold when you feel a stretch in your right buttock muscles. Be sure your head and shoulders are relaxed. Repeat with other leg.

 

  1. Floor quadriceps stretch: Lie down on your right side. Have your head rested on you right arm comfortably. With your left hand reach and grasp your left ankle. Begin to slowly pull your leg back while keeping your foot close to your buttocks. You should feel a stretch along the front of your thigh. Repeat with other leg.

 

  1. Seated Hamstring stretch- While seated on the floor, place one leg out in front of you and place the foot of other leg on the medial part of the knee (making a figure four). Reach forward, bending at the waist, and grasp your hands around the toes of your outstretched leg and bring them towards your body. You should feel a stretch along your low back, through your glutes, along your posterior thigh, and into your ankle. Repeat for the opposite leg.

 

  1. Hollywoods: Sitting on the floor with legs outstretched, place your right ankle on the outside of your left knee. Put your left elbow on the outside of your right knee, and twist your torso to tension. Be sure your neck and shoulders are relaxed. Repeat with other leg.

 

  1. Butterflys- While seated on the floor, place the soles of your feet together, and bring them into your body as much as possible. Begin to lean forward from the hips. Clasp your hands around your feet and bring your body toward them until you feel a stretch. You should feel the stretch along the inner thighs. You can push your elbows down into your knees/thighs to increase the stretching if needed.

 

  1. Hip flexor lunge: Standing up, place one foot in front of you. Be sure to bend the knee no more than 90 degrees. Place your other leg behind you as far as possible and be sure the heel is off the ground. Slowly begin to lean forward until you feel a stretch along the front of the thigh on the leg that is behind you. Be sure to keep your head and chest up, relaxed, and looking forward. Put your hands on your bent knee for support. Repeat for other leg.

 

Remember to hold stretches at tension for 30 seconds. This is the time needed for the muscle and tissue to relax and lengthen. Do not stretch into a painful range, this can cause injury. Hold the stretches where you start to feel the muscle tension (mild discomfort).

Check out the following links for more stretching ideas and routines:

wrist and arm

Stretching at your desk

Everyday Stretches

 

This post is for education purposes only. Be sure you are healthy enough before starting any stretching or exercise regiment.Image

Microbreak stretches: Wrist and Arm

Microbreak

Focusing on your arms when stretching at your desk

 The following is a microbreak stretching routine that you can do at your desk. It focuses on your hands and arms. It is meant to help relax the muscles that may lead to carpal tunnel disorders. It should take less than 5 minutes, and it’ll do a world of good for you if done regularly!

 

  1. Prayer stretch: While seated put your palms together in front of your chest just below your chin. Slowly lower your hands toward the floor until you feel the stretch in you wrists.

 

  1. Wrist extension: While sitting, stretch one hand palm down out in front of you (elbow straight). With the other hand press the back of your outstretched hand down so that your fingers point at the floor until you feel a stretch on the top of your forearm. Repeat for other hand.

 

  1. Wrist flexion: While sitting, stretch one hand palm down out in front of you (elbow straight). Use your other hand to grasp under the fingers and pull up. Slowly pull your fingers upward and back towards your body until you feel a stretch on the bottom of your forearm. Repeat for other hand.

 

  1. Seated extension: While sitting, interlock your fingers and stretch your hands, palms up, above your head. Try to reach to the ceiling with your arms and lean back slightly. Bring your head to your back and hold when you feel slight discomfort.

 

  1. Bruegger’s stretch: While sitting bring your chest up and tuck your chin. Be sure you are looking forward still. Bring your shoulder blades together with arms outstretched and as far behind you as you can. Be sure your palms are facing up. You should feel a stretch in your pectoral muscles, the back of your neck, and between your shoulder blades.

 

  1. Standing wrist flexion stretch: Stand up and place your hands palm down on a desk. With your fingers flat and your elbows straight begin to lean forward bringing your chest over your hands. Hold when you begin to feel a stretch in your wrists.

 

Remember to hold stretches at tension for 30 seconds. This is the time needed for the muscle and tissue to relax and lengthen. Do not stretch into a painful range, this can cause injury. Hold the stretches where you start to feel the muscle tension (mild discomfort).

 

This post is for education purposes only. Be sure you are healthy enough before starting any stretching or exercise regiment.

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